Learn to use the Ensembl Genome Browser main site, which is an extensive database browser for a large variety of species genomes from human to yeast. Ensembl gives the user the ability to browse an annotated graphical display of the genome and associated annotations for specific genomic regions and search the database for detailed information. Ensembl also allows you to compare whole genome alignments and conserved regions across various species. Tools are also provided to BLAST or BLAT against any genome sequence. This tutorial emphasizes versions beyond v51 of the release cycle, which involved major changes to the interface.

You will learn:

  • how to use the browser to see genomic data in context
  • about the different views of the data
  • to use the sequence search to find desired data
  • where to conduct advanced searches of the data
TUTORIAL RELATED CONTENT

TUTORIALS

This tutorial is a part of the tutorial group Genome Browsers. You might find the other tutorials in the group interesting:

Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG): IMG is a powerful community resource for the comparative analysis and annotation of microbial genome data.

GBrowse: GBrowse User Introductory Tutorial

Overview of Genome Browsers: Various Genome Browsers examined

Ensembl Legacy: Older version of Ensembl Genome Browser

Map Viewer: Map Viewer Genome Browser from NCBI


This tutorial is a part of the tutorial group Plant resources. You might find the other tutorials in the group interesting:

TAIR: The Arabidopsis Information Resource

PlantGDB: Plant Genome Database

GBrowse: GBrowse User Introductory Tutorial

Ensembl Legacy: Older version of Ensembl Genome Browser

Gramene: A resource on rice and other grass genomes

World Tour of Genomics Resources: A World Tour of Genome Resources for finding and learning the right resource for your needs.

CATEGORIES

EBI : This category includes all resources maintained at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI)

Genome Databases (euk) : Genomic databases or repositories primarily aimed at eukaryotic organisms. Some may contain prokaryotic data as well.

BLOG POSTS

Video Tip of the Week: UniProt updates, now including portable BED files: UniProt is one of the core resources that provides tremendously important curated information about proteins. You will find links to UniProt in lots of other tools and databases as well, but we've alwa...

Video Tip of the Week: Send UCSC Genome Browser sequence to external tools: The folks at the UCSC Genome Browser are always adding new features, new data, and new genomes to their site. And although they use the genome-announce mailing list to get the word out, even I can miss...

Video Tip of the Week: PanelApp, from the 100000 Genomes Project: Genomics England is responsible for the 100,000 Genomes Project Last week I talked about the 100,000 Genomes Project in the UK. That video tip was an introduction and overview of the project. This wee...

Friday SNPpets: This week's SNPpets include tidbits about the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC), new RepeatMasker track at UCSC Genome Browser, sequencing undiagnosed patients, the African Genome Variation Project, ...

Bioinformatics tools extracted from a typical mammalian genome project [supplement]: This is Table 1 that accompanies the full blog post: Bioinformatics tools extracted from a typical mammalian genome project. See the main post for the details and explanation. The table is too long to ...

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