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Performs multiple sequence alignments

Tutorial and training materials by OpenHelix

Learn to use the ClustalW2 resource at the EBI Toolbox site for performing multiple sequence alignments, or MSA. MSA allow us to analyze the evolutionary relationship between species on a molecular sequence level. As well, multiple sequence alignments can help us to identify functionally important positions in a sequence family by simply looking at the conservation of positions or motifs within the sequence data.
Download the example data file by clicking here.
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You'll learn:

  • some background and theory for multiple sequence alignments
  • how to conduct sequence alignments using
  • to understand and adjust the results of ClustalW2 alignments


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More about the resource:

ClustalW2 web-based interface featured in this tutorial is provided by the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI). The Clustal program was originally published by Thompson et al from Toby Gibsons group in 1994, and was later updated by Larkin et al. ClustalW can be downloaded as source code or as binaries for various operating systems at www.clustal.org, provided by the Conway Institute at the University College of Dublin.


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