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Various Genome Browsers examined

Tutorial and training materials by OpenHelix

Become aware of genome browser resources with this introductory tutorial. Genome browsers organize tremendous volumes of genome sequence data, adding context to genomic sequence with many types of annotations. Several major genome web browsers are widely used to search, retrieve, and display genome information for human and numerous other species. Here we introduce Ensembl, Map Viewer, UCSC Genome Browser, and the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) browser. We also introduce the GBrowse software system, which is the framework for many additional genome browsers. Biomedical researchers need to be aware of these resources and be able to access the data available within.
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You'll learn:

  • where to find these useful tools
  • an overview of the organization and display features
  • some guidance on how or why to choose a given browser for your research needs


Related tutorials

This tutorial is a part of the tutorial group Genome Browsers. You might find the other tutorials in the group interesting:

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Recent BioMed Central research articles citing this resource

Wiland Ewa et al., Cytogenetic and molecular analyses of de novo translocation dic(9;13)(p11.2;p12) in an infertile male. Molecular Cytogenetics (2014) doi:10.1186/1755-8166-7-14

Fleischmann K Katrin et al., RNAi-mediated silencing of MLL-AF9 reveals leukemia-associated downstream targets and processes. Molecular Cancer (2014) doi:10.1186/1476-4598-13-27

Du Jingjing et al., Selection on synonymous codons in mammalian rhodopsins: a possible role in optimizing translational processes Genome evolution and evolutionary systems biology. BMC Evolutionary Biology (2014) doi:10.1186/1471-2148-14-96

Kemper E Kathryn et al., Selection for complex traits leaves little or no classic signatures of selection Non-human and non-rodent vertebrate genomics. BMC Genomics (2014) doi:10.1186/1471-2164-15-246

Campos Catarina et al., Thermal plasticity of the miRNA transcriptome during Senegalese sole development Non-human and non-rodent vertebrate genomics. BMC Genomics (2014) doi:10.1186/1471-2164-15-525

More about the resource:

The Ensembl browser is provided by the Sanger Institute and the EBI. Map Viewer comes to you from the NCBI. UCSC Genome Browser is produced by the Genome Bioinformatics Group at UC Santa Cruz. Integrated Microbial Genome (IMG) is supported by the DOE Joint Genome Institute, US Department of Energy. GBrowse is an open-source software program developed by the Generic Model Organism Database (GMOD) .


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The materials and slides offered can not be resold or used for profit purposes. Reproduction, distribution and/or use is strictly limited to instructional purposes only and can not be used for for monetary gain or wide distribution.
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